Our Chaplaincy - spiritual health care in the NHS

Date: 26 July 2017

Chaplain

Since first opening in 1905 as a Naval Hospital, Medway NHS Foundation Trust has always had a chaplaincy.

The chaplaincy and spiritual care team welcomes everyone – patients, visitors and hospital staff. You do not have to think of yourself as ‘religious’ or attend a place of worship to make use of the service.

Much of the team’s work is that of listening and offering compassion to patients and their families as part of providing good care.

The task of a chaplain is to ‘be with and to be for’ the patient, without judgement. We place a high value upon a person’s individual experience and work mostly on a ‘one-to-one’ basis, in complete confidentiality and trust.

Among the areas where chaplains offer pastoral and spiritual care are:

  • bereavement
  • religious needs
  • pregnancy loss
  • end-of-life issues
  • facing distressing news
  • care of the dying and of their relatives
  • the effects of sudden death
  • care of palliative patients.

Trust Chaplain Linda Cooke said: “Coming into hospital as a patient, relative or carer can sometimes be very daunting. 

“Here at Medway we support people of all faiths and beliefs, as well as people who do not have a particular religious belief but who would like someone to talk to.

“We are available to everyone, from individuals just seeking ‘a listening ear’ to being present at times of distress and anxiety.

“We all live such hectic lifestyles and the chaplaincy offers a quiet, supportive space for everyone. We all need support at some point in our lives”.

Services

  • Friday prayers
    Every lunch the chaplaincy offers an open prayers session allowing everyone to join. Join us from approx. 1pm.
  • Sunday morning service
    Each Sunday at 11am there is a Christian ecumenical service in the chapel. All patients, visitors and staff are welcome. Wheelchair transport available on request.

 

  • Summary:

    The chaplaincy and spiritual care team welcomes everyone – patients, visitors and hospital staff. You do not have to think of yourself as ‘religious’ or attend a place of worship to make use of the service.